Late June in the Veg Garden

Things get off to a slower start up here, so the vegetable garden is really just beginning to show signs of life.  Granted we’ve been harvesting asparagus, lettuce and kale for a few weeks already.  But to many, the garden would have looked remarkably bare until a few days ago.  Progress has not been aided by the below average rain fall or the fluctuating temps.

But we’ve received some much needed rain over the past 2 days and our temperatures have been consistently warmer (a little too warm this past weekend!).  With this, we’ve seen a bit of growth. I harvested the first of the snap peas, shelling peas and Swiss chard this evening.  Sautéed in a little olive oil and garlic, they made a nice add to this evening’s pasta.  Below are some photos from over the weekend – before the rains.

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One of several young bunnies hanging about in the orchard right now.  This is why my veg garden is fenced!
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One of the many “volunteer” poppies in the veg garden – self-seeded from last year
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Shelling peas
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The “Three Sisters” – pole beans, corn and acorn squash
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Morning Glories growing up the tripod with zucchini and summer squash nearby; green bush beans in the  background and self-seeded chamomile in the pathway
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Borage – the bees LOVE this

A Rose By Any Other Name…

Many of the roses have started to bloom in the garden, including several of this year’s new additions.

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One of the new additions (above and below photos) — a David Austin rose called the “Generous Gardener.” This is from his English Rose collection and has a wonderful double/full bloom.  The fragrance is a mix of the old rose with hints of musk and myrrh.

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This one is looking a little frayed around the edges from the rose chafers, which are out in force right now, but it’s a lovely hedge rose with a beautiful lavender colored, full bloom.  It’s already survived 3 North Country winters, so it’s a keeper.
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Iceberg rose – a floribunda rose cultivar bred in Germany; it is a shrub rose that produces an abundance of blooms and is a repeat bloomer.  Although a shrub rose, I’ve trained mine to run along the split rail fences in a rambling fashion.
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Tucked in among the penstemon, this rose has numerous, tiny light pink blooms.  It’s called a Pink Grootendorst and is cold-hardy.  It forms a strong, bushy shrub and flowers continuously once it starts in mid-June.
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“Great Maiden’s Blush” – a shrub rose with delicate pink blossoms, this rose has a lineage dating back to pre-15th century.  It blooms only once, but the bloom period can last up to 6 weeks.  Very cold hardy.

Just Visiting

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I found these two little ones in the chicken coop last evening – not a safe place for baby mice!  I have no idea what possessed mother mouse to have her babies in a hen coop, nor was there any sign of mom or additional babies.  These two were wandering about and I almost stepped on one of them.  I suspect they’re no more than a week or two old.  Their eyes are not yet open and they’re about an inch long.  I didn’t have much hope that we could keep them alive, even overnight, but alas they’re still hanging in there!  I went out and picked up some kitten formula and have been feeding them every hour or so. 

 According to what I read online, once they open their eyes, they should be able to be weaned from the formula and started on small seeds (gerbil or hamster food).  They’re adorable and I do hope they make it.

A Few of Our Residents

Part of the joy of gardening is the creation of a habitat that is welcoming to the local wildlife.  This means that occasionally (or more often than not) you sacrifice a plant or two to satisfy the natives, but generally the plants rebound and the local wildlife is satiated.

In addition to several young rabbits roaming the garden, we currently have a young woodchuck as well.  He’s taken up residence under our gazebo, along with the rabbits and chipmunks.  In fact, I envision a teeming NYC tenement when I think of what life must be like under there with so many bodies of different ethnicities.

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Mr. Young Chubs, since we have an elder on the property as well

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One of our many chippies
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Our goldfinch couple

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Mid-June – What a Delight!

Then followed that beautiful season… Summer….
Filled was the air with a dreamy and magical light; and the landscape
Lay as if new created in all the freshness of childhood.
~Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

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Bearded Iris “Raptor Red” – a new addition to the hot border this season
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Japanese Willow and peonies in the background; lupine, catmint, foxglove, Lady’s Mantle, verbascum and the seed heads of the spent alliums in the fore
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Another view of the circle garden — catmint, foxglove, Lady’s Mantle and a dwarf spruce
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Peony “Festiva Maxima”
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Peony “Sarah Bernhardt”
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Penstemon “Pocahontas”
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Valerian Alba
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Hairy Woodpecker (I think)
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Columbine in the shade garden

Photos from Connecticut

“The love of gardening is a seed once sown that never dies.” -Gertrude Jekyll

We stayed with friends while we were in CT the past few days.  Their house is nestled among trees, native ferns and Cheri’s amazing gardens with a vista of rolling meadows and ridges.  I could feel my entire body heave a relaxed sigh when I arrived among such beauty — the sea of green waving gently in the breeze welcoming us; the trees whispering, the many wind chimes tinkling, and the turkey and guinea hens calling out a warning that some unknown people had entered their paradise.

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